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Fall 2013


September Events

Conscious Speakers Series:  An Interfaith Dialogue with Rabbi Neal Katz and Anwar Khalifa

Despite opposing beliefs, an unlikely pair of community leaders, have joined efforts in breaking down barriers of intolerance and hate. Neal Katz, a Rabbi, and Anwar Khalifa, a Muslim, are known for their extraordinary leadership in nearby Tyler, TX. Join the Office of Multicultural Affairs on this journey about friendship, humility, and service.

Who: Rabbi Neal Katz and Anwar Khalifa (Sponsored by the Multicultural Center)

Where: Multimedia Room (2.106, Baker Pattillo Student Center)

When:  September 11, 2013, 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Managing Classroom Behavior and Promoting Student Success: A Guide for Faculty and Staff.

It seems like each year the expectations of students and faculty with regard to what is appropriate in the classroom grow further and further apart. National trends also demonstrate that students seem to be exhibiting more troubling and sometimes extreme behavior. Often faculty express frustration that these behaviors can distract them from their most important priorities, to meet the course objectives and educate students about their subject matter.

Dealing with this issue requires a comprehensive and institutional approach. This seminar will connect faculty to institutional resources and strategies for preventing behavior that disrupt the educational environment, dealing with disruption when it occurs and reporting it afterwards. It will also discuss the iCare program which uses faculty referrals of students at risk of leaving to connect these students to the resources they need to be successful. 

 Who: Adam Peck, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs, SFASU

Where: Tiered Meeting Room (2.201, Baker Pattillo Student Center)

When: September 20, 2013, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

 

October Events

The Centrality of the Classroom: Developing a Framework for Student Success that Places the Classroom at the Center

Vincent Tinto is an award winning Distinguished University Professor at Syracuse University of sociology. He is a noted theorist in the field of higher education, particularly concerning student retention and learning communities.

Tinto received his Ph.D. in education and sociology from the University of Chicago after earning a Bachelor of Science in physics at Fordham University in 1963. He was chair of the higher education program at Syracuse from 1999 to 2006. His best known work is probably his heavily cited book, Leaving College (1993, 2nd Edition), published by the University of Chicago Press, in which he created a theory derived from the work of Emile Durkheim on suicide. This work compares such departure to the idea of leaving society (i.e., via suicide) due to a failure of the student and the campus to create a sense of belonging for the student.

His career has involved the conduct of research on higher education, particularly on student retention and the impact of learning communities on student growth and attainment. Tinto has served as a consultant to many federal and state agencies, independent research firms, foundations, and with two- and four-year institutions of higher education. He has also served on the editorial boards of several journals, organizations, and professional associations concerned with higher education.

In 1990 Tinto served as Associate Director of the six-million-dollar National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment funded by the U.S. Office of Education. He has worked with the Council for Opportunity in Education, the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Education, the European Access Network, and the Graduate Record Examination Board. As a member of the Pathways to College Network, he is currently engaged in a national effort to increase access to college.

Date and Time: October 15, 1:30 PM

Place: Kennedy Auditorium


Conscious Speakers Series:  A Discourse on Native American Culture with Dr. Joe Watkins

Dr. Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief of the Tribal Relations and American Cultures Program at the National Park Service in Washington, DC, will be leading a discussion about the importance and preservation of Native American culture. A member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Dr. Watkins specializes in anthropology with a specialization in archeology. Join for a conversation about working with diverse populations and how to nurture the voice of the Native American student.

Who: Dr. Joe Watkins (Sponsored by the Multicultural Center)

Where: Multimedia Room (Room 2.106, Baker Pattillo Student Center)

When:  October 24, 2013, 12:00 p.m. (noon)

 

November Events

SFA Faculty and Staff -

Join us for a conversation with Andrew Slack

Founder of The Harry Potter Alliance
(http://thehpalliance.org/what-we-do/)


“The Harry Potter Alliance (HPA) is a 501c3 nonprofit that takes an outside-of-the-box approach to civic engagement by using parallels from the Harry Potter books to educate and mobilize young people across the world toward issues of literacy, equality, and human rights ... Our goal is to make civic engagement exciting by channeling the entertainment-saturated facets of our culture toward mobilization for deep and lasting social change.”

 

Sponsored by:

Student Engagement Programs - Leadership and Service

Teaching Excellence Center

Service Learning Advisory Board

Where: Twilight Ballroom, BPSC

When: November 8, 1:30 - 3 PM


Bullying in the Classroom and the Workplace

As part of the SFA Anti-Bullying Awarness Week, Robert Hackenson, certified by the Anti-Defamation League, will discuss bullying that takes place in the classroom and the workplace. He will address how faculty may deal with and become aware of bullying in the classroom (student-student, student-faculty, and faculty-student). Additionally he will address bullying in the office setting.

Who: Robert Hackenson

Where: Tiered Meeting Room (2.201, Baker Pattillo Student Center)

When: November 21, 2 - 3 PM

Expanding the Common Intellectual Theme: Collaborative Learning In and Out of the Classroom

All are welcome and encouraged to participate in our on-going dialogue targeting expansion of the common intellectual theme for the 2014-15 academic year.  A Common intellectual theme can encourage open discussion, civil discourse, and critical thinking beyond the classroom. It could also serve as a platform for stakeholders across campus to enhance student engagement in the intellectual life of the campus, and to foster a sense of community across our entire campus and extended community.  This presentation will provide a brief overview of common intellectual theme approaches as well as overview of recent SFA common theme programs that have proven successful in recent years.  The goal is to expand the discussion with interested stakeholders across SFA how best to scale up the current Common Theme program to include more of the SFA community.

First Year Experience Resource Links
http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/First-Year-Experience-Resource-Links.aspx


Common Book vs. Common Problem: the future of creating common experiences http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/theubiquitouslibrarian/2013/08/06/common-book-vs-common-problem-the-future-of-creating-common-experiences/

Date: November 25, 2013

Time: 2:20 – 3:30 PM
Location: BPSC-2.201 Tiered Meeting Room


Spring 2013


High Impact Practices

Part of SFASU’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) is to improve our students’ higher order thinking skills and classroom and community engagement. The Office of High Impact Practices is implementing collaborative assignments and projects, mentored undergraduate scholarship, and field-based learning platforms to address the QEP objectives. This seminar will present information about implementing these practices into your course as well as information about participating in upcoming Faculty Learning Circles.

Led by: Dr. Tara Newman
Date and Time: February 13, noon
Location:  Teaching Excellence Center Conference Room, Library 220A

Designing and Teaching a High-Impact Capstone Course

This online seminar will walk you through a six-step process so that your capstone courses offer your students an invaluable integrative experience right before graduation.

You’ll learn how to:

•Identify and articulate desired learning outcomes for a capstone course
•Select a course model to enable students to achieve learning outcomes
•Develop guidelines for student projects
•Design opportunities and engage students in critical reflection
•Determine assessment strategies and criteria
•Showcase student achievements
•Tackle administrative and financial issues related to implementing capstone courses

The seminar will be led by Barbara Jacoby, PhD. Dr. Jacoby teaches a high-impact capstone course at the University of Maryland, College Park and, as capstone courses have become increasingly popular at all types of colleges and universities, she has advised faculty around the country about how to develop a capstone course to meet their students’ needs.

Date and Time: February 28, 1-2 PM
Place: Tiered Classroom, BPSC 2.201
 

Teaching Naked: Technology and E-Communication for Student Engagement

Face-to-face (naked) interaction between faculty and students remains our most precious and expensive teaching technique, so the most important benefits to using technology occur outside of the classroom. Technology provides new ways for students to receive first contact with material and instead use class time for interactions that can spark more critical thinking. But e-communication technology also offers many new opportunities to connect with students digitally and advance student learning. Give students more opportunities to write. Provide more feedback and more chances for students to connect with material. Lower the stakes and raise standards with micro tests. This workshop is focused on student engagement to prepare for class.

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

• Develop an e-Communication policy
• Investigate why, when and how to use e-Communication
• Examine how podcasts and online content can transform student preparation
• Analyze the ease and benefits of online exams before every class

Who: Dr. José Bowen, SMU
When: Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 2 - 3:30 PM
Where: Steen Library 220A

Social Media and the Classroom:

Have you gotten on the Pinterest bandwagon? Chances are your students have. In this hands on workshop we’ll discuss Pinterest in the classroom, setting up pinboards for collaborative work and also Learnist. By the time you leave, you will have a pinboard to share with your colleagues or classes.

 

Who: Dr. Chay Runnells
When: Tuesday March 26, 3:30-4:40 pm

Where: InfoLab2, Steen Library

Acquiring Second Language Writing Skills: Integrating SLA and Writing Research

Historically, Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research has primarily focused on speaking skills. Second language writing research has generally followed the concerns of first language writing research. However, very recently researchers and practitioners have been questioning the divide that the two traditional perspectives have constructed. This presentation will look at some central ideas (among them the roles of meta-language, practice and attention) in SLA research to see what they might have to offer first and second language writing research and practice.


Who: Dr. Steven Brown, Youngstown State University
When: Monday, April 8, 2013, 2 PM

Where: Wyatt Room, Library

Week of Reflection/Day of Gratitude

The Teaching Excellence Center and the Division of University Affairs present, “Getting the Most out of the Week of Reflection.” This event is intended to encourage students to pause and reflect upon everything that they have learned both inside and outside of the classroom this year, and how it has changed them. Adam Peck, Dean of Student Affairs, will lead a discussion on the purpose of the week and what faculty can do to encourage critical reflection in the classroom. 

Led by: Adam Peck
Date and Time: April
Place: Tiered Meeting Room, BPSC 2.201


Fall 2012 Seminars


Teaching Students with Disabilities

It is SFASU policy (F-33) that no qualified handicapped student be excluded, denied, or discriminated against in the classroom or research facility. A number of us have disabled students in our courses and may feel unsure as to how to instruct them better and what services are available to ensure their successful education at SFASU. This seminar will address those issues and any other questions that you may have.

Led by: Tiffany Rivers
Date and Time: September 25, 1:00 - 2:00 PM
Location: Steen 220-A  

Managing Classroom Behavior and Promoting Student Success: A Guide for Faculty and Staff.

It seems like each year the expectations of students and faculty with regard to what is appropriate in the classroom grow further and further apart. National trends also demonstrate that students seem to be exhibiting more troubling and sometimes extreme behavior. Often faculty express frustration that these behaviors can distract them from their most important priorities, to meet the course objectives and educate students about their subject matter.

Dealing with this issue requires a comprehensive and institutional approach. This seminar will connect faculty to institutional resources and strategies for preventing behavior that disrupt the educational environment, dealing with disruption when it occurs and reporting it afterwards. It will also discuss the iCare program which uses faculty referrals of students at risk of leaving the university to connect these students to the resources they need to be successful.


Led by: Adam Peck, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs, SFASU
Dates and Times: October 1, 2012, 3:00 - 4:00 PM
Location: Multi-media Room, BPSC 2.106

Generation Me

“We live in a time when high self-esteem is encouraged from childhood, when young people have more freedom and independence than ever, but also far more depression, anxiety, cynicism, and loneliness... More than any other generation in history, the children of [this generation] are disappointed by what they find when they arrive at adulthood.” Psychologist and educator Dr. Jean Twenge, whose books include  “Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled—and More Miserable Than Ever Before” and “The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement,” will speak about the depression, anxiety, cynicism,and loneliness of students today.

Faculty Meet and Greet
Date and Time: October 26, 2012, 4:30 - 5:15 PM
Location: President's Suite B, BPSC

Led By: Dr Jean Twenge
Date and Time: October 27, 2012, 10 AM
Location: Grand Ballroom, Baker Patillo Student Center

Those planning on staying for lunch should RSVP byt clicking here:
http://www.sfaodk.org/odk-leadership-conference.html
You will need to have an account on Axes to register. Please contact Jamie Bouldin (jfbouldin@sfasu.edu) if you have problems registering.  

Should Professors be Facebook Friends with their Students?

The prevalence of today’s social media used by both faculty and students has exploded in the past decade. Many professors get Facebook “friend” requests from their students. While it is often an easy way to contact our students and an easy way to get an answer about a question from class, often times professor-student boundaries can become blurred and disappear. This seminar will address those issues from professors who use Facebook with their students and those that do not.

Led by: Dr. Michael Tkacik, Court Carney, Linda Bobo
Date and Time: November 14, 2012, noon (12:00 p.m.)
Location: Teaching Excellence Center Conference Room, Library 220A


Spring 2012 Seminars

Making Presentations with Prezi

Many are familiar with PowerPoint, the software that changed public speaking forever. But have you heard about Prezi, the free online tool for creating dynamic presentations? Learn all about it from Amanda.

Date: February 23
Time: Noon
Location: BPSC Rm 2.106
Presenter: Amanda Flores, Assistant Director of Multicultural Affairs
 

Proof Reading Like a Pro: Catch and Correct Common Mistakes

Do you want to be able to catch some of the most common grammatical and syntax mistakes? Pat Spence will walk you through the steps for becoming a more effective proof reader.

Date: March 19
Time: Noon
Location: BPSC Rm 2.106
Presenter: Pat Spence, Director of Student Publications

 

Save a Life: Learn QPR

Suicide is the second leading cause of death of college students. QPR is a workshop designed to teach the skills needed to identify and respond to someone who may be suicidal. Upon completion of the workshop, each participant becomes a “QPR Gatekeeper.”

Date: April 26
Time: Noon
Location: BPSC Rm 2.106
Presenter: Office of Counseling Services


Fall 2011 Seminars

Records Management Seminar


With Stephen F. Austin State University being a state funded institute, the University and its employees must follow rules that govern the management of records set by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.  The Commission has created standards for how long certain records must be kept.  By following these rules it protects both yourself and the University from possible litigation and censure.  This workshop will cover how to deal with these records through the basics of reading the Records Retention Schedule (RRS), filling out disposition logs, and the proper way of disposing of records.

Date: September 20
TIme: 9 AM
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen 220A
Presenter: Greg Bailey, University Archivist, Records Manager


Working with Groups


Working with groups can be a nightmare, and some faculty prefer to stay away from any such thing. However, group projects can be effective and fun learning experiences. Learn different strategies for incorporating group activities into your classrooms, and explore the reasons students need to be exposed to this type of instruction.


Date: October 11
Time: 2 PM
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen 220A
Presenter: Ken Untiedt, Department of English


Turning Technologies Webinar Series on Clickers

The campus standard in Audience Response Systems (clickers) will be offering a four part series on clickers every Wednesday in September. We at the TEC will host in the OIT Conference (Steen 214).  Each webinar is one hour and is scheduled from 1 – 2 PM.

Wednesday, September 7th

 

Michael S. LaPointe Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology,
Indiana University Northwest

"Using Turning Technologies' Tools for Exams, Attendance, and More"

Running large lecture classes that include multiple laboratory and discussion sections presents exceptional organizational challenges that smaller classes don't possess. One common problem with large lecture classes is student anonymity, and thus a tendency for students to skip some lectures. The use of clickers makes attendance fast and easy in the lecture hall, and allows the instructor to provide extra credit points to the students in attendance. Clickers also allow exams given in multiple discussion sections to be quickly and easily graded and combined for incorporation into a master grade sheet or posted to the lecture course website.

Wednesday, September 14th


Matt Morgan, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry, Hamline University

"Combining Both Clickers and ResponseWare in the Same Learning Environment"

Students can receive educational benefits from TurningPoint and TurningPoint AnyWhere even if they don't have access to an RF response device. ResponseWare allows students with a web-enabled device such as a laptop, smartphone, or tablet to respond to TurningPoint questions. Hamline University's Chemistry and Society course is taught to students using a mixture of devices including standard clickers and ResponseWare.   
Wednesday, September 21st


Elizabeth C. Scheyder P.E., Senior Instructional Technology Specialist
University of Pennsylvania

"Anonymous or Not? The Pros and Cons of Using Clickers in Registration Mode"

One of the first questions instructors ask when they begin to implement clickers is, "Should students vote anonymously or tracked?" Through Scheyder's work with clickers and faculty in a wide variety of academic departments, she has developed best practices in various situations. Scheyder will share reasons to use clickers, how much weight a vote should carry when tracked and how tracking students with a participant list can be used to encourage participation and situations where students want their responses to be private.

Wednesday, September 28th, 2 p.m. - 3 p. m. EST

Tony Onofrietti, M.S., CRSS, Director of Research Education
The University of Utah

"Improving Research Ethics Training with Interactive Technology"

What steps can you take to develop effective educational programs in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) for your faculty, postdoctoral scholars, staff and students? This instructional webinar will explain best practices for using clickers in research ethics training and will describe proven techniques in designing, implementing and documenting a successful learning experience.



"The Future of Higher Education:  A Return to Fair Weather, or More Stormy Skies Ahead?"

Higher education has seen a tough couple of years, mostly due to global economic downturn. Uncertainty about the economy persists, and there are new questions about the higher education industry itself. Will state funding of public institutions continue to decline, even when the economy finally picks up? Are for-profit universities down and out, or will they regroup and come back stronger, presenting a threat to traditional institutions? Is online learning an over-hyped fad or a potentially disruptive technology? Join Henry Eyring for this Guest Lecture to explore these questions and forecast the future of higher education.


Presenter: Henry Eyring, Brigham Young University - Idaho
Date: 
28 Sep 2011
Time: Noon - 1 PM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


Net-Zero Energy Buildings: The Next Shift in "Going Green"?
The increasing cost of energy and international pressure to address climate change are forcing some major shifts in high performance building strategies in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world. Coupled with lower construction costs, tax breaks and other incentives, and more favorable pricing for renewable energy systems - particularly photovoltaics - the implementation of net-zero energy (NZE) strategies for commercial and residential construction is rapidly moving from concept to reality. Migrating to NZE buildings is being embedded in U.S. energy strategy; California has already mandated NZE residential buildings by 2020 and NZE commercial buildings by 2030.

Presenter: Charles Kibert, University of Florida
Date: 
5 Oct 2011
Time: Noon - 1 PM
Place: TEC Confrence, Steen 220A


Bridging the Gap: Cynthia Young’s Top 10 Teaching Tips

Has a student ever said, "I understand you in class, but when I get home I am lost"?  There is a gap that exists between when we have our students in class and later on when they are working independently outside of the classroom.  During this Guest Lecture, Dr. Cynthia Young, veteran mathematics professor and author, shares her Top 10 Teaching Tips on how to bridge that gap.

Presenter: Cynthia Young, University of Central Florida
Date:
27 Oct 2011
Time: 
10 - 11 AM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


"Developing Customized and Well-Designed Case Studies"

Case study analysis is an important tool for helping students develop the skills needed to apply the basic content they learn in their microbiology course; however, it can be difficult to find case studies that fit well in a particular classroom. How do we resolve this issue? Customization! Case studies can be customized to meet the specific needs of a course, including content and learning objectives. Additionally, well-designed cases can help students apply course content and develop important professional skills such as patience, empathy, and an understanding of trans-cultural health care issues. In this Guest Lecture, Rod Anderson will provide you with classroom-tested guidelines for case study development and resources for generating scenarios based on actual infectious disease cases.

Presenter: Rod Anderson, Ohio Northern University
Date: 
25 Oct 2011
Time: 
10 - 11 AM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


"The Power of the Mind-Body Connection"

In this Guest Lecture, Catherine Sanderson focuses on the surprising new science regarding the power of the mind-body connection. In particular, Catherine explores three ways in which people's thoughts and feelings influence physical reaction: a) how situational factors - such as the appearance of food and the presence of an eating partner - influence eating behavior, b) how thoughts and relationships influence the experience of pain, health behaviors (e.g., smoking and obesity), and our physical health, and c) how psychological factors influence arousal, attraction, and love.

Presenter: Catherine Sanderson, Amherst College
Date: 
7 Nov 2011

Time: 1 - 2 PM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


"Starting and Ending Well: The Bookends for a Successful Class"

In this Guest Lecture, Johnnie Rosenauer addresses this highly popular topic and speaks to the multiple dichotomies when attempting to "bookend" your class with both a successful start and finish. On the front end, making the first class count is not just about taking attendance, reviewing grading, and immediately jumping into discipline discussion. Research conducted at San Antonio College reveals that many instructors are "into their subject" within 20 minutes. Johnnie explores the merit of giving a different picture in this all important first class. Likewise as the semester winds down, some instructors will bear down in order to feed a few extra pieces of information into the students' heads. In this session, Johnnie also demonstrates that there is a better approach than this "more is better" tactic, one that will really help the students see what is most important and discover any "holes" that may exist in their understanding.

Presenter: Johnnie Rosenauer, San Antonio College
Date: 10 Nov 2011
Time: 2 - 3 PM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


"Classroom Management: Preventing and Responding to Disruptive Students In and Out of The Classroom"

Over the last ten years, there has been an increase in the number and severity of behavioral incidents in the classrooms and on campuses. More and more, it is incumbent upon instructors to intervene in the classroom to address behaviors that can interfere with teaching and learning. Using a combination of lecture and case studies taken from actual incidents, this workshop will provide instructors with tools to appropriately address these behaviors. Participants will be provided with skills to prevent disruptive behaviors, to react to them, and tips on how to enhance their own campus procedures to address abhorrent behaviors.

Presenter: W. Scott Lewis, J.D.
Date: 16 Nov 2011
TIme: 1 - 2 PM
Place: BPSC Tiered Classroom, 2.201


Service-learning: New Voices at the Table

This “mini-workshop” will describe Service-learning as a unique and innovative pedagogy in higher education, and provide information on resources available to revise an existing SFA course to include a Service-Learning component.  The material to be covered is multidisciplinary in nature and can be adapted for use in any academic area.


Led by: J.B. Watson, Jr., Dept. of Social & Cultural Analysis
December 1, 3-4:15 PM
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

 



"Measuring Student Leadership Behavior: Help Your Students Grow as Leaders"

Leadership experts Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner wrote the book on how to liberate the leader in every student using their proven Student Leadership Challenge model. Grounded in more than 25 years of extensive research, they have identified the FIVE PRACTICES OF EXEMPLARY LEADERSHIP that are common when leaders are able to make extraordinary things happen.

  1. Model the Way
  2. Inspire a Shared Vision
  3. Challenge the Process
  4. Enable Others to Act
  5. Encourage the Heart


Certified Facilitator and student affairs professional Gary Morgan will introduce you to this comprehensive student leadership program, illustrate the ease and value of measuring student leadership behavior, and offer creative ideas for integrating leadership measurement into your existing programs. 

During this Guest Lecture, you'll get:

  • A brief overview of The Student Leadership Challenge model
  • Guidance on assessing and measuring student leadership behavior
  • Training options and other resources for leadership educators
  • An introduction to the Student Leadership Practices Inventory, including..

         • Administering and reporting results of the Student LPI
         • Interpreting and articulating the results to students
         • Understanding the validity and reliability of the assessment
         • Using the results to further student leadership development

Presenter: Gary Morgan, Student Leadership Excellence Academy
Date: 
5 Dec 2011
Time:
3 - 4 PM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


"Teach Like a Champion"


Are great teachers born or are they made? Doug Lemov knows that great teachers are made and, during this Guest Lecture, will discuss a set of evidence-based, field-tested teaching techniques called the "taxonomy of effective teaching practices." The taxonomy was recently published as the best-selling book, Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College, and Doug's work was also featured last March in The New York Times Magazine cover story, "Building a Better Teacher." Join Doug as he describes these techniques and shares how they may be integrated in a college course.  During this presentation, Doug will also present video clips of actual classrooms.  The videos show student and teacher interactions and make clear how teachers successfully use these techniques to set high academic expectations and close student performance gaps.

Presenter: Doug Lemov, Uncommon Schools
Date: 
7 Dec 2011

Time: 2 - 3 PM
Place:
TEC Conference, Steen 220A


Spring 2011 Workshops

Undergraduate Research

One of the Quality Enhancement Programs of SFASU is in the area of undergraduate research. We have SFA faculty who are members of the National Council on Undergraduate Research and others who simply invite undergraduates into their lab. We have put together a panel who will discuss their efforts, how they got started, and tips on how you may proceed.
Led by: Eric Jones (Kinesiology & Health Science), Leslie Cecil (Social and Cultural Analysis, Dan Bruton (Physics and Astronomy), and Carrie Brown (Research and Sponsored Programs).
Date and Time: February 15, 3:00 – 4 PM
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

 

The Art of Authoring and Publishing

That book is in you trying to get out. Whether it is a completed manuscript or a growing idea, eventually you want to get it published. We have invited a distinguished panel of renowned authors to share their stories of how they successfully navigated the publishing maze and came out sane.

Led by: John Moore (Chemistry), Archie McDonald (History), and James Town (Communications Studies)

Date and Time: March 9, 10:00 – 11:00 AM

Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

 

Parenthood Juggle

This panel discussion centers on young professional parents – specifically SFA faculty with young children. We all want what is best for our kids and to spend quality time with them, but the pressures of the job can sometimes get in the way. Our panel will discuss issues such as human resource questions (sick time, maternity leave, tenure clock, etc.), child care issues, juggling publishing requirements with family responsibilities, tips on service (when to say yes, when to say no, what's worth saying yes to), and others.

We will experiment in this workshop with the concept of the one hour conference. After a brief keynote address, we plan short breakout sessions to discuss various aspects. We then get the whole group back together to share.

Led by: Heather Olson Beal and Amanda Rudolph (Secondary Ed), and Christina Guenther (Music)

Date and Time: April 15, 12:00 – 1:00 PM
                 April 20, 12:00 - 1:00 PM

Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

 

Defining Teaching Excellence

A distinguished panel of department chairs from every college on campus will lead this discussion. Many departments are revisiting their policy on tenure and promotion. The University policy says that we need to demonstrate excellence in teaching, but the question is "How do we define what excellence means." We would like to stimulate ideas of how we can measure excellence without being unnecessarily obtrusive. In the modern era of assessment and evaluation, the old adage of "I'll know it when I see it" is insufficient.

Led by: Joseph Ormsby (Marketing, Management, and International Business), Dale Perritt (Agriculture), Betty Alford (Secondary Ed.), Dennis Gravatt (Biology), John Roberts (Music), Mark Sanders (English and Philosophy), and Ric Berry (Provost)

Date and Time: May 3, 3 PM

Place: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

Week of Reflection/Day of Gratitude

The Teaching Excellence Center and the Division of University Affairs present, “Getting the Most out of the Week of Reflection.” This event is intended to encourage students to pause and reflect upon everything that they have learned both inside and outside of the classroom this year, and how it has changed them. Adam Peck, Dean of Student Affairs, will lead a discussion on the purpose of the week and what faculty can do to encourage critical reflection in the classroom. Here are some helpful links about the event.

Reflection Guide for Faculty

Week of Reflection Poster

Reflection Card

Led by: Adam Peck

Date and Time: TBA

Place: Tiered Meeting Room, BPSC 2.201


Fall 2010 Workshops
Managing Classroom Behavior and Promoting Student Success: A Guide for Faculty and Staff.

It seems like each year the expectations of students and faculty with regard to what is appropriate in the classroom grow further and further apart. National trends also demonstrate that students seem to be exhibiting more troubling and sometimes extreme behavior. Often faculty express frustration that these behaviors can distract them from their most important priorities, to meet the course objectives and educate students about their subject matter.

Dealing with this issue requires a comprehensive and institutional approach. This workshop will connect faculty to institutional resources and strategies for preventing behavior that disrupt the educational environment, dealing with disruption when it occurs and reporting it afterwards. It will also discuss the Early Alert program which uses faculty referrals of students at risk of leaving the university to connect these students to the resources they need to be successful.
Led by: Adam Peck, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs, SFASU
Dates and Times: September 15, 10:00 - 10:50 AM; September 20, 3:00 - 3:50 PM
Location: BPSC Multimedia Room 2.201

October

Generation Y

Make plans to join the SFA Teaching Excellence Center and the Office of Student Affairs for an afternoon with Dr. Tim Elmore.  Dr. Elmore is president of Growing Leaders (GrowingLeaders.com) and has consulted with faculty and staff at universities nationwide on the topic of engaging students in the classroom in the age of Facebook. His work includes guidance in implementing classroom strategies to work with generational differences including Millennials, Gen X and Gen Y students. He has been invited to address the faculty at Stanford, Duke and Oklahoma.
Date and Time: Friday, October 15 a 3 PM
Location: BPSC Multimedia Room 2.201

Much ado about Clickers

Turning Technologies Response Card XR was adopted as the campus standard last year. Since that time many faculty members have experimented with their use in the classroom. Clickers are also called personal or audience response devices and allow everyone of your students to respond to questions posed to them during lecture. This use of technology in the classroom has proven to be very popular with the students and faculty alike. Have you been thinking about clickers but don’t know what they are good for or maybe don’t know how to start? This workshop is not intended as a training session, but as a panel discussion of the many uses of clickers.

Panel Members: Brent Burt, Norm Markworth, Ed Michaels
Date: October 20
Time: 3 PM
Place: The Teaching Excellence Center,  Steen Library 220A

November

Engaging Students in the Lecture

You have heard the expert complain that faculty abuse and misuse Power Point. How can we really reach our students and engage their minds in coursework. José A. Bowen, dean of the Meadows School of the Arts, has challenged his colleagues to "teach naked"—by which he means, sans machines. We offer this workshop with tips on how that may be done. Our leader is Rhonda Williams, owner of Express Personnel in Nacogdoches.  Rhonda comes to us after a thirty year career in New York theatre, in front of a live audience every night. Come and share her insight into how to keep ‘em comin’ back.


Led by: Rhonda Williams
Dates and Times: November 8 at 2:00 PM and November 11 at 3:00 PM
Place: Teaching Excellence center (Steen Library 220A).

December

All Things Printing

University employees throughout history have been challenged by decreasing budgets and increasing demands.  To better serve the SFA community Printing Services would like to offer formatting and printing tips on creating course related material and SFA event literature. These tips are designed to educate faculty or staff on the wide variety of cost effective options that are out there for course packs, programs, posters, flyers, and brochures. This workshop will also educate individuals on how to talk printing lingo, and fill out work requests to get exactly what you desire.  If you are planning on creating a course pack with assignments and have always wondered what would be the cheapest and highest quality option for your department and your students this workshop will give you the opportunity to ask. We will be there to give examples of course related materials such as three hole punched packets, coil bound or fastback tape bound workbooks, perfed assignment pages, color vs. black print on brochures/flyers/etc and many other ideas. Come and join us to discuss all your printing options.


Led by: Rebecca Galatas
Date and Time: December 7 at 3:00 PM CANCELED
Place: Teaching Excellence center (Steen Library 220A).


Spring 2010 Workshops

March

The Library – Your Information One-Stop

We live in an information age, but how can you direct your students to the proper resources if you’re still searching for the card catalogue?  Modern libraries are so much more than books and journals.  This workshop will jump start your reintroduction to the SFA Library.

Led by: Tina Oswald and Marty Turnage
Dates and Times: March 3 at 2:30 PM and March 23 at 9 AM
Place: Teaching Excellence center (Steen Library 220A).

Webinar on Developing and Using Multiple Choice Exam

This workshop will assist assessment leaders and faculty construct valid and reliable tests that address course and program outcomes. The workshop will provide the necessary background to help participants coach their colleagues to develop exams that evaluate learning beyond the level of recognition. By using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain (1956), participants will learn how to construct a test blueprint to address not only course content, but the depth of learning desired, thus ensuring valid results. They will learn how to construct items and tests that accurately measure course or program outcomes reliably and how to evaluate these tests and test results for outcome assessment purposes, both for formative and summative purposes. They also will learn how to use test results to help pinpoint learning weaknesses. In addition, participants will learn how to encourage students to prepare for tests demanding deeper learning tests.

Led by: Terri Flateby, Ph.D.
Dates and Times: March 4,  2:00 - 3:30 PM
Place: LAN 102

April

The Teaching Portfolio

A teaching portfolio is a coherent set of materials that represents your teaching practices as related to student learning. “Teaching practice” in its broadest sense extends beyond the obvious activities that go into teaching a course to include all activities that enrich student learning.  The teaching portfolio in is a tool, helping you organize, articulate and support your teaching contributions and documentation.  This is your chance to make a case for your effectiveness as a university teacher. Think about your portfolio in much the same way as you approach a research question, and build a case to support your ‘effective teacher' thesis.  This seminar will review the purpose, content and usefulness of a teaching portfolio.


Led by: Dennis Gravatt, Biology
Date and Times: April 21, 9 AM and April 22, 3 PM
Place: Teaching Excellence Center (Steen Library 220A)

Week of Reflection/Day of Gratitude

The Teaching Excellence Center and the Division of University Affairs present, “Getting the Most out of the Week of Reflection.” This event (April 26 - 30) is intended to encourage students to pause and reflect upon everything that they have learned both inside and outside of the classroom this year, and how it has changed them.  Adam Peck, Dean of Student Affairs, will lead a discussion on the purpose of the week and what faculty can do to encourage critical reflection in the classroom.  Here are some helpful links about the event.
Reflection Guide for Faculty
Week of Reflection Poster
Reflection Card

Led by: Adam Peck
Date and Time: April 14, 3 PM
Place: Tiered Meeting Room, BPSC 2.201

Defining Teaching Excellence

A distinguished panel of department chairs from every college on campus will lead this discussion.  Many departments are revisiting their policy on tenure and promotion.  The University policy says that we need to demonstrate excellence in teaching, but the question is "How do we define what excellence means."  We would like to stimulate ideas of how we can measure excellence without being unnecessarily obtrusive.  In the modern era of assessment and evaluation, the old adage of "I'll know it when I see it" is insufficient.

Moderated by: Teaching Excellence Directors
Date and Time: April 26, 2 PM
Place: Teaching Excellence Center (Steen Library 220A)

Embrace Diversity!

The College of Education and the Teaching Excellence are sponsoring a panel discussion entitled Embracing Diversity: Fostering a Climate of Respect at SFA. The discussion is geared toward all faculty and staff to begin discussing diversity issues we face in classroom settings. Participants will come away with practical ideas they can implement in their class.

Date and Time: Friday April 23 from 1:30 to 3:00
Place: BPSC 2.106



Fall 2009 Workshops

 

September

Managing Classroom Behavior and Promoting Student Success: A Guide for Faculty and Staff

It seems like each year the expectations of students and faculty with regard to what is appropriate in the classroom grow further and further apart.National trends also demonstrate that students seem to be exhibiting more troubling and sometimes extreme behavior. Often faculty express frustration that these behaviors can distract them from their most important priorities, to meet the course objectives and educate students about their subject matter.

Dealing with this issue requires a comprehensive and institutional approach. This workshop will connect faculty to institutional resources and strategies for preventing behavior that disrupt the educational environment, dealing with disruption when it occurs and reporting it afterwards. It will also discuss the new Early Alert program which uses faculty referrals of students at risk of leaving the university to connect these students to the resources they need to be successful.


Led by: Adam Peck, Ph.D., Dean of Student Affairs, SFASU
Date and Time: September 14, 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Location: BPSC Multimedia Room 2.201

Use of the Turning Point Clickers - Best Practices

A year ago a committee was charged with recommending a campus standard for Personal Response Systems (clickers). The committee recommended Turning Technologies ResponseCard XR. This system is now in use in a variety of classrooms across campus. Our presenters are ahead of the curve on the use of this particular clicker and they plan an educational hour-long workshop to guide you in their use.

Led by: Brent Burt and Mike Collyer, SFA Department of Biology
Dates and Times: Monday, September 21, 2 PM and Tuesday, September 22, 11 AM.
Location: TEC Classroom, Library 220A.

Principles and Profiles of Good Practice in Assessment

If you're interested in learning the secrets to assessment success, you won't want to miss it. Join us in this lunch hour audio seminar.

Dr. Trudy Banta, Ed. D., Professor of Higher Education and Senior Advisor to the Chancellor for Academic Planning and Evaluation at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will share the "best of the best" ideas gleaned from her research. In a lively, 60-minute audio presentation, she'll report on:

  • Principles for planning, implementing and sustaining outcomes assessment.
  • Best practices for assessment in general education, major fields and graduate programs.
  • Innovative ways to use technology in assessment.
  • How to use faculty development as a resource for assessment.
  • And much more!

Led by: Trudy Banta, Ed. D., IUPUI
Date and Time: September 23, noon - 1:00 PM
Location: Kennedy Auditorium

October

Save a Life - Learn QPR

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for college students, and this tragic statistic is no different at Stephen F Austin. Have you ever been concerned about a student, but unsure about what to say? Counseling Services is offering a free workshop to teach the skills to identify and help a person in danger. On completion, each participant will receive a certification as a "Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper."

Led by: Counseling Services
October 9, noon - 1 PM
Location: Rusk 333

November


Service Learning: Teaching through Civic Engagement

You know that Service Learning is the up-and-coming thing in Higher Education.  You also know that SFASU has set Service Learning as one of its objectives in Strategic Plan 2013.  But what is it and how do you incorporate it into your course?  Sharon Templeman and Emmerentie Oliphant from the School of Social Work along with their students will enlighten us with a presentation and stories from their experiences.

Led by: Sharon Templeman and Emmerentie Oliphant
November 10 and 16, 11:00 - 12:00
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A

EXCEL solutions to Assessment Data Analysis

The assessments have been conducted and you now have a mountain of data to analyze and report on. How can you know when 70% of the class is scoring 70% or better on your assessment instrument? This workshop is specifically targeted at the analysis of multiple choice embedded questions in medium to large classes. We will present solutions for manual grading, clicker testing, and Blackboard online tests. A working knowledge of MS EXCEL is assumed.

Led by: Norm Markworth
November 17, 2 PM
Location: TEC Classroom, Steen Library 220A



Spring 2009 Workshops


February

Classroom Management: Preventing and Responding to Disruptive Students In and Out of the Classroom Scott Lewis brings over fifteen years of experience as a student affairs administrator, faculty member, and consultant in higher education.  He is a frequent keynote and plenary speaker, nationally recognized for his work on Behavioral Intervention for students in crisis and distress.  He is noted as well for his work in the area of classroom management and dealing with disruptive students. He presents regularly throughout the country, assisting colleges and universities with legal, judicia